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Matthew Sanders

Keynote speaker

Parenting support in a changing world

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Marinus H. van IJzendoorn

Keynote speaker

What works for whom? A differential susceptibility perspective on parenting interventions

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Bryan Samuels

Keynote speaker

Child Well-being in the United States: Advancing the Use of Evidence and Science

More...

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Neil Humphrey

Keynote speaker

Schools and families united in the promotion of children's social and emotional wellbeing: towards an integrated model of provision

More...

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Kurt Hahlweg

Invited speaker

Ten Year Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled and an Uncontrolled Trial of Triple P-Group: Outcome for Parent and Child Variables

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Alina Morawska

Invited speaker

Childhood Chronic Illness: The Role of Parenting Intervention

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Anna Sarkadi

Invited speaker

A classic revisited: Using the Gaussian distribution curve as an outcome measure for public health interventions

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Ron Prinz

Invited speaker

Navigating the Challenges of Parental Substance Abuse

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Trees Pels

Invited speaker

Triple P and Diversity in Parenting in the Netherlands

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Carine Kielstra

Invited speaker

Triple P in Amsterdam: Implementation of the Triple P system in a diverse society

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Helping Families Change Conference

The Helping Families Change Conference is a leading international scientific event. The conference is of interest to practitioners, policy makers, and researchers working with families in the health, education, and welfare sectors, and to graduate students with an interest in child and family issues. Those attending will be presented with state-of-the-art knowledge, contribute to debate, and engage in hands-on practice with leaders in the field of family intervention.

Early Career Research Award

In recognition of research that exhibits excellence and innovation contributing to the scientific basis of Triple P.

Triple P Practice Excellence Award

In recognition of an accredited individual Triple P practitioner who exhibits excellence and innovation in the implementation of Triple P.

The theme for the 17th Annual conference is

Parenting in a changing and complicated world

Key dates

  • Abstract submissions open

    26 April 2015

  • Registrations open

    1 June 2014

  • Abstract submissions close

    28 August 2015

  • Conference dates

    3 – 5 February 2016

© Copyright - Helping Families Change Conference
Matthew Sanders

Keynote speaker

Keynote: Parenting support in a changing world
This presentation explores the fundamental question of how we best deliver evidence based parenting support programs to communities to increase the likelihood of achieve population level changes in targeted child and parent outcomes. Learnings derived from large scale roll outs of the Triple P system are used to identify essential criteria that need to be met for the approach to work in practice. As Triple P evolves through ongoing research and development and through learnings derived from clinical experience in using the approach, strategies for increasing reach of interventions with vulnerable families and for enhancing outcomes are discussed. Relatively unexplored areas of future application are identified.
Masterclass: Enhancing Your Impact as an Individual Triple P Practitioner
This master class focuses on ways individual practitioners delivering different levels of Triple P can enhance the outcomes they achieve in working with families. These enhancement strategies include strategies that improve retention and full participation by parents; strategies that involve tailoring and customization of the program to full attend to the needs of presenting families; strategies concerning the organizational context that supports the delivery of evidence based programs with fidelity and cultural sensitivity and finally strategies that promote efficiency and cost saving so more families can be served at lower per person costs. How practitioners can promote self regulation in children, parents and organizations is discussed.
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Marinus H. van IJzendoorn

Keynote speaker

What works for whom? A differential susceptibility perspective on parenting interventions
Some children are more open to influences of their rearing environment than others. Differential susceptibility theory proposes an evolutionary-based model in which genetically or temperamentally vulnerable children are also considered to be more sensitive to positive change in their environment. The metaphor of orchid and dandelion children has been used to confer the meaning of this model which is radically different from diathesis-stress theory. From a differential susceptibility perspective the modest efficacy of parenting interventions might be explained by a combination of strong effects in the susceptible group and weak or absent effects in the non-susceptible group. Differential susceptibility theory uncovers the hidden efficacy of interventions.
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Bryan Samuels

Keynote speaker

Child Well-being in the United States: Advancing the Use of Evidence and Science
The U.S. Federal Government’s Adoptions and Safe Families Act of 1997 laid out three outcomes that child welfare agencies and organizations are legally mandated to promote: safety, permanency, and well-being. Over the past decade and a half, common practice has been to focus on the first two of these goals, frequently at the expense of the third. Yet there is mounting evidence that complex trauma, toxic stress, and adverse childhood experiences are crucial factors in restricting positive health and education outcomes and in increasing the likelihood of exposure to future trauma. By utilizing evidence-based interventions such as KEEP and the Safe Babies Court Teams Project, different U.S. state governments have been able to improve the well-being of children, promote their mental and emotional development, and help decrease the likelihood of a return to the child welfare system. By highlighting the wealth of scientific research on child well-being and identifying key programs and interventions that have been able to successfully utilize this research, this presentation will investigate how to help ensure that children not only progress through the child welfare system, but actually thrive within it.
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Neil Humphrey

Keynote speaker

Schools and families united in the promotion of children's social and emotional wellbeing: towards an integrated model of provision
In this keynote address I will explore the role of schools and families in promoting children's social and emotional wellbeing. I will draw upon Bronfenbrenner's ecological systems theory and Domitrovich et al's work on integrated models of school-based prevention as tools through which to theorise the powerful, synergistic effects of school-family collaboration on outcomes for children and young people. This will then be put to the test as I explore the evidence base and ask 'what does the research actually tell us?'.
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Kurt Hahlweg

Invited speaker

Ten Year Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled and an Uncontrolled Trial of Triple P-Group: Outcome for Parent and Child Variables
Parent training is a major intervention for preventing behavior problems in childhood. The aim of the paper is to analyze the ten-year efficacy of the Triple P parent group training as a universal prevention strategy from the perspective of mothers and fathers. At pre, 17 preschools were recruited for participation. Based on their respective preschool, families were either randomly assigned to a Triple P group parent training or a control group. The efficacy was analysed with a multimethod and multimodal assessment in 280 families. Furthermore, an uncontrolled trial was conducted with At the follow-up’s up to 4 years later, most of the significant post-treatment changes were maintained. Mothers reported a significant reduction in dysfunctional parenting (PS), child behavior problems (CBCL), and in their psychological distress (DASS), while their relationship satisfaction (ADAS) improved. A 10-year follow-up was conducted and 248 families from the randomized controlled study were re-interviewed (retention rate 90%) as well as 100 families from the low-SES-group. Results on the 10-year efficacy and effectiveness studies will be presented and implications for the prevention of mental health problems and limitations of the study will be discussed.
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Alina Morawska

Invited speaker

Childhood Chronic Illness: The Role of Parenting Intervention
Childhood chronic illnesses such as asthma, eczema and diabetes are common with rising prevalence rates. The morbidity and quality of life outcomes for childhood chronic illnesses are well documented and these illnesses place an enormous burden on the affected children, their families, and the broader community. Despite consistent evidence as to the impact of childhood chronic illness, links with child emotional and behavioural problems, and documented poor adherence to medical interventions, existing psychosocial approaches to help children with chronic health conditions and their families have had limited success. This presentation will outline the links between chronic childhood illness, emotional and behavioural problems, and difficulties with adherence to illness management. The rationale for targeting parenting in the context of childhood illness, along with existing evidence for parenting interventions will be explored, followed by recommendations for developing and implementing interventions for parents of chronically ill children.
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Anna Sarkadi

Invited speaker

A classic revisited: Using the Gaussian distribution curve as an outcome measure for public health interventions
Demonstrating impact of a population health intervention can be very challenging: several trials using Triple P as a universal approach have yielded disappointing results. This is a common phenomenon in evaluations of population health interventions and raises the question of how we should be analysing our data. Using analytical methods developed for clinical trials carries the danger of controlling out very factors which are of intrinsic interest when the goal is to improve population health. In addition, these methods focus on individual and not population level change.
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Ron Prinz

Invited speaker

Navigating the Challenges of Parental Substance Abuse
Drug and alcohol problems in parents can adversely impact parenting, child safety and well-being, and children’s developmental trajectories. Child protective services workers are painfully cognizant of the extent to which parental substance abuse permeates many child maltreatment cases. The interplay between parenting and parental substance abuse is complicated and presents major challenges to providers of parenting and family support. A parent with a drug or alcohol problem is dealing not only with their own self-doubts associated with an addiction and its side effects, but also with the fears and realities arising from the legal and child-protection systems. This presentation: (a) reviews the state of research on dual treatment of caregiver substance abuse and parenting difficulties; (b) covers some of the inherent obstacles and experiences faced by intervention providers serving this population; (c) considers some potentially fruitful strategies; and, (d) identifies future directions for practitioners, researchers, and policymakers.
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Trees Pels

Invited speaker

Triple P and Diversity in Parenting in the Netherlands
The population of the Netherlands, especially its urban regions, increasingly has become multi-ethnic in composition, due to economical and asylum immigration in the past fifty years. Nevertheless, service institutions, for instance those providing pedagogic support and care for youth and families, are less accessible to and less effectively dealing with migrants and their offspring, compared to the mainstream population. My presentation deals with the gap between families and family services, with the focus on parenting support. What needs do migrant parents have and to what extent are their needs met by the available supply of parenting support? An important reason for the underrepresentation of migrant parents in the support system is that professionals and interventions are not yet fully equipped to serve clients with a diverse social, cultural and religious background. In the last part of my presentation I will discuss Triple P in this context, in part based on the study of the implementation of Triple P in multi-ethnic populations in the Netherlands.
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Carine Kielstra

Invited speaker

Triple P in Amsterdam: Implementation of the Triple P system in a diverse society
This conference is held at the heart of Amsterdam, the city that supported a large scale population roll-out of Triple P. This presentation will highlight the successful implementation of Triple P in the city of Amsterdam and the lessons learned. It will also outline the maintenance phase of implementation, discussing how to ensure that Triple P becomes part of standard services. You will be presented of examples of how parents with diverse social, cultural and linguistic backgrounds were reached and how Triple P was tailored to their needs. This presentation aims to provide suggestions and tips for implementing Triple P in a diverse and complex society, based on the experience in Amsterdam.
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